Mom Deserves a Whole Month

We think moms rock and they need more than a day!

mothers

All mothers are working mothers.  — Author Unknown

True, at Plum District we’re all about making YOUR day, every day, but this May we wanted to shout it from the rooftops 24/7. Being a mom is one of the hardest and most rewarding jobs in the world and that’s why we want to celebrate above and beyond May 13th. Check out our site for exciting promotions and deals this entire month that are about celebrating you!

To start off the “Month of Mom” we found some fun facts from www.mothersdaycelebration.com that we thought were just too cool/juicy/fun NOT to share.

  •  In the vast majority of the world’s languages, the word for “mother” begins with the letter M.
  • The earliest history of Mothers Day dates back to the ancient annual spring festival the Greeks dedicated to maternal goddesses. The Greeks used the occasion to honor Rhea, wife of Cronus and the mother of many deities of Greek mythology.
  • Jayne Bleackley is the mother who holds the record for the shortest interval between two children born. She gave birth to Joseph Robert on September 3, 1999, and Annie Jessica Joyce on March 30, 2000. The babies were born 208 days apart.

  • Elizabeth Ann Buttle is the mother who holds the record for the longest interval between the birth of two children. She gave birth to Belinda on May 19,1956 and Joseph on November 20, 1997. The babies were born 41 years 185 days apart. The mother was 60 years old when her son Joseph was born.
  • 24.8 is the median age of women when they give birth for the first time – meaning one-half are above this age and one-half are below. The median age has risen nearly three years since 1970.
  • Many of the sweaters worn by Mr. Rogers on the popular television show, Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood, were actually knitted by his real mother.
  • August is the most popular month in which to have a baby, with more than 360,000 births taking place that month in 2001
Fun mommy animal facts:
  • A female oyster over her lifetime may produce over 100 million young.
  • A mother giraffe often gives birth while standing, so the new born’s first experience outside the womb is a 1.8-meter (6-foot) drop.
  • Kittens are born both blind and deaf, but the vibration of their mother’s purring is a physical signal that the kittens can feel – it acts like a homing device, signaling them to nurse.
  • Just like people, mother chimpanzees often develop lifelong relationships with their offspring.

Keep checking back to the blog for fun M.O.M. entries, great deals, and surprise guest bloggers!

Making Composting Easy and Fun

We all know the earth feeds our families, but we can feed the earth too. Read today's post to learn how!

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The purpose of composting is pretty simple: to reuse your organic trash and renew your soil. Adding compost to your yard can make your soil, plants, trees and lawn healthier. Plus, you’ll cut down trash headed for the landfill by 30%.

We chatted with two Plum District Moms to see how they incorporated composting in their homes.

Ginger, of Los Angeles,  says ever since installing the compost bin and utilizing a “food scraps” container (a small metal bin right near the sink), she’s amazed at how much less trash she’s producing and how good it feels to re-cycle. Her family’s daily routine includes a trip to the backyard with their food-scrap-filled canister to “feed” the compost bin.

Liz, of Denver, recommends a simple black trash can ($12) with the bottom cut out and air holes punched in the sides. You can also Google the word “composting” to see if your city offers free containers. The Department of Sanitation in your town just may surprise you!

Here’s what to put in your new compost bin (it’s an easy equation):

Half green, half brown, a little water, a little air flow, and heat.

  • Green is your vegetable and green plant scraps, or your nitrogen: carrot peels, apple cores, lettuce scraps, pepper cores, orange peels, potato skins, celery tops, grass clippings.
  • Brown is your dead plant matter, or carbon: last fall’s leaves, deadheads and old twigs from your bushes, grass clippings that you let dry in the sun for a day or two.

The key is getting the mix right. Water the bin until the mix is moist like a sponge. Then make sure there are some air holes, put the lid on and let it heat up! If you have the mix right (the 50/50 split) it shouldn’t smell at all. If it does start to smell like ammonia, you’ve got too much green stuff. Add some brown.

(Note! Here’s what you should not put in the bin: No meat, no fats. No steak bones, or cheese rinds, or leftover bacon, or last night’s salad with blue cheese dressing).

Now that you’ve collected your bin, you can keep it right in your garden. The sun heats it up, and the good compost-making worms and bugs will crawl right in. When it’s time to harvest, just lift up the trash can, and that handy hole in the bottom lets the rich brown compost fall out! You can distribute the compost through your soil to increase its richness and feed our earth!

Composting is a great daily activity for you and the kids. It teaches the whole gang to be conscious of the earth and reinforces how even the littlest effort makes the biggest difference.

Liz Easterly writes StapletonMoms.com in Denver, where she keeps a little backyard garden and a $12 trash can compost bin that her two boys help care for. Ginger lives with her husband and two children in Los Angeles, CA and loves working for Plum District.  Since starting composting a year ago, she feels a little better about doing her small part to leave a healthier planet behind for the next generation.